A New Thought author called William Latson wrote:

“One of the never failing marks of the common mind, the untrained, inefficient mind, is that the mental pictures it contains are confused, blurred, inexact.

A person with such a mind will tell you that an auto car just passed him on the road.

“Was it a big, red car?” you ask. Well, he does not quite know. It might have been red, and yet he guesses it was black; possibly it was gray.

How many people were in it? three or four or five — four, he thinks.

Ask him to give you an outline of a book he has read or a play he has seen, and he is equally helpless. And so on.

Such a person is the typical inefficient. You will find thousands of these inefficients filling unimportant places in shops and offices. And even the trivial duties of such positions they are unable to perform properly.

They cannot read a line of shorthand notes and be sure of its meaning; they cannot add a column of figures and be certain of the result without repeated checking’s.

Such unfortunates are the “flotsam and jetsam” of the commercial world — the unfit who, in the struggle for existence, must necessarily be crowded out by those whose mental processes are more positive and more exact.”

While the examples given in this quote are clearly outdated, the message is not.

A superior mind will always outperform the untrained, common mind, in life events. A superior mind clearly gives you many advantages in your own day to day life.

That’s why we have trainings like Concentration and Mind Control. It’s mind training at its best. Not easy for sure, but well worth your while.