Here’s an interesting quote from William Walker Atkinson:

“I urge upon all who read this book the importance of beginning to cultivate concentration. Begin by acquiring the habit of attending to one thing at a time, concentrating the attention upon it, and then completing it and passing on to another thing. Avoid the baneful practice of thinking of one thing while doing another. Think of and work upon the thing before you, and hold your attention there until it is completed. The thinking and action should pull together, instead of in opposite directions.

An eminent authority tells us that:

“It is a matter of no small importance that we acquire the habit of doing only one thing at a time, by which I mean that while attending to any one object, our thoughts ought not to wander to another.”

Another authority adds: “A frequent cause of failure in the faculty of attention, is striving to think of more than one thing at a time.”

Another says: “She did things easily because she attended to them in the doing. When she made bread, she thought of bread, and not of the fashion of her next dress, or of her partner at the last dance.”

The celebrated Lord Chesterfield said: “There is time enough for everything in the course of a day, if you do but one thing at a time; but there is not time enough in a year if you try to do two things at a time.””

Atkinson’s lesson is very clear. Do one thing at a time. Both in the actual doing and in your own mind.

It seems like a common sense thought. But most people are not following it. It’s not easy to be completely focused on something with the exclusion of everything else.

Maybe on the outside you only have a book opened and it may seem like you are only reading it. But what is happening inside your mind often tells a different story. You want to have mind, body, energy, emotions in whatever you are doing.

Develop your concentration with the training:
>>> Concentration and Mind Control